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Baby courgette, chestnut mushrooms and pancetta linguini

Fresh linguini with baby courgettes, chestnut mushrooms and pancetta, a super delicious pasta recipe made with homemade tomato juice and topped with an indulgent sprinkle of parmesan cheese. 

Course Main Course
Cuisine Italian, Ramona's Cuisine
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
Author Ramona

Ingredients

  • 300 g fresh pasta
  • 120 g pancetta
  • 5-6 chestnut mushrooms
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 Pinch Salt and Pepper to taste *
  • 100 g courgette baby
  • 300 ml tomato juice homemade*
  • 30 g Parmesan cheese finely grated
  • 1 Thai chili chopped
  • Basil to garnish
Metric - US Imperial

Instructions

  1. Place a pot with sufficient water to cook the pasta over heat and cook the pasta for 2 min. It will cook for another minute or two at the end in a sauce so bear this in mind. I can't eat a pasta that's been overly cooked. It has to be al dente.
  2. Meanwhile let’s make the sauce by place a pan over a medium heat and when hot add the pancetta, cook for 1 min and throw in the crushed and finely chopped garlic and the mushrooms all chopped nicely. Cook for another minute or two stirring a couple of times.

  3. Add the chopped baby courgettes and some freshly ground black pepper and the chilli if you choose to use. I don't add salt as pancetta is normally pretty salty. Cook for 2 more minutes.

  4. Add the tomato juice and let it simmer and reduce for 4-5 minutes. Because my tomato juice is fairly runny I put the pasta to cook it straight into this pasta sauce and the pasta cooks and soaks in all those juices. If you use a thicker version of a tomato sauce you will not need to do this. Just add the pasta that’s been boiled/cooked separately and toss in for a minute . 

Recipe Notes

Courgette, chestnut mushrooms and pancetta linguini

I never thought when I started cooking this pasta that will go up on the blog but it did turn out so good that I couldn't bear not to share (a bit of rhyming too).

My point where I'm trying to get also is that I have an excuse for not having great pics for this recipe. Well, there was not much time so please excuse my pics.

I will replace those as soon as I will make this again but the whole thing is that you get an idea about it. I can assure you that it tastes a lot better than it looks here in my rushed pictures. Take my word. The taste I’m sure is mainly given by the linguini and pancetta of course (not to be compared with bacon) and of course the homemade tomato sauce.

The history of this homemade tomato sauce....

This summer my sexy and so lovely gardener (aka my husband) planted a few tomato plants which were so generous and produced so many tomatoes that at some point I did not know what to do with.

Yes, we were eating loads of salads almost every day, yes I was cooking with them and still had around 4-5 kg of tiny sweet and super juicy cherry tomatoes in the fridge.

Even more history for my homemade tomato juice...;-)  

How I've made this delicious homemade tomato sauce or juice even.... Well, one day, I took all out of the fridge (kept them in a paper bag- they store well when they are ripe to perfection), washed and chopped about 1/4 of them.

I put one somewhat larger pot on medium heat and added the chopped tomatoes in first followed by the whole ones. I've covered them up with a lid and cooked for about 30 minutes stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile I prepared some jars, sterilised them in the oven ready for getting filled up with this superb tomato juice.

After boiling the tomatoes for about 30 min, I've added 1 tbsp Himalayan pink salt, some Sicilian dry basil (which I bought in Italy when I was there around Easter time) gave it a nice stir and boiled it for 5 more minutes. Now it's the grown-up stuff coming.

Filling up the jars is the hardest bit because they need filling pretty quickly and neatly so there is no need for washing them (if smudged - no worries at this point).

I normally use a smaller ladle so while the tomato juice is still on the heat (lowest heat now) and simmers away this needs to be put in jars and the jars need to be covered with new lids immediately.

I like the traditional way my mum used to make her winter preserves...It is how she used to make all the winter preserves- she’s changed few bits lately (using the bain-marie technique) but I didn’t.

I like to keep the traditional way for some reason. It works for me better this way and I love it. So part of the tradition is also to prepare a blanket or two in which you will put your very hot jars and keep them covered.

When you finished and the last jar went in you cover them properly even with adding an extra blanket and leave them for a day or two or even three (depending on the quantity) until they have completely cooled. If they are smudged slightly, as I was saying, don’t worry, you can wipe them clean once they have cooled. Do not attempt doing this while hot - it is not fun burning your fingers.

This is it. It's a pretty rewarding process and not difficult at all. I made it all a big story here but it could have been put all in a more simplistic way .

Here you have it folks and I feel obliged to point out that no market tomato sauce/juice compares with this.

Home-made stuff is always home-made stuff. The tangy edge to this can be taken by adding a pinch of sugar or honey when cooking with but I like it this way.

The flavours.... oh, these little homegrown cherry tomatoes can have....it’s pure heaven ;-)

If you do like this recipe you might also like this linguini with seafood salad or this amazing carbs free spiralised zucchini pasta

 
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